“The tambura is back. But where are the players?” – Interviews in The Hindu

Gaining prominence Despite the many alternatives available today, fortunately we still get to see the tambura player on stage. In fact, the first thing many musicians do after accepting a concert date is to book their preferred tambura player. As more musicians show a renewed interest in the instrument, the tambura is experiencing a resurgence. …

All craftsmen in Miraj are musicians – the wonderfully resonant Tanpura (Tambura)

Miraj is famous for tanpuras made by its craftsmen, who honed their skills by first becoming trained musicians. How did it ever strike someone to stick a piece of wood on a dried pumpkin, build this bridge and that and twist some strings on it, to make this wonderfully resonant thing one calls the tanpura? …

“Only a tambura can bring in a tranquil aura”: Musicians comment on the convenience and compromise of digital tanpura

The four strings of the tambura that provide sruthi or the basic swara (pitch) for musicians are considered the life force for any melodic exercise. Fixed in jack wood to enhance the naada, yesteryear musicians were stuck to this pitch provider because there were no alternatives. […] While many are comfortable with the electronic gadget …

Video | Tambura-tanpura explained

Source: Musical instrument (tanpura) with keys for four string, © Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 2021URL: https://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O452622/stringed-instrument/Date Visited: 7 December 2021 The tambura or tanpura is a plucked drone instrument used to accompany instrumental or vocal performances. The four strings are played open rather than being depressed to alter the note. This example is considerably …

The tambura’s role in perfect alignment to pitch: “The most beautiful way to discover music” – T.M. Krishna

To sing just with the tanpura has been revealing: TM Krishna M Suganth | Times of India | Nov 27, 2014 | To read the full article, click here >> They had collaborated earlier for Margazhi Raagam, which was a first-of-its-kind Carnatic concert film and now, singer TM Krishna and filmmaker Jayendra have come together …

“My music is an extension of my tambura” – Bombay Jayashri

Can digital alternatives substitute the original symbol of sruti?by Aruna Chandaraju in The Hindu, 29 March 2018 >> Classical musicians have many concerns. A major one is having a perfectly tuned tambura — when practising and performing. Naturally. The tambura aka tanpura, is the keeper of the pitch. It is the guardian of the right …

Life-giver and soul of Indian music: The Tambura (tanpura) according to T.M. Krishna

In his recent book, A Southern Music: The Karnatik Story, T.M. Krishna reflects on those misconceptions and stereotypes that stand in the way of truly appreciating South Indian music. He reiterates the unique role played by the (acoustic) tambura / tanpura which is all too rarely heard ‘live’ in Indian concerts today.   For this eminent singer “it …

Tambura / Tanpura “tree of enlightenment” for Mallikarjun Mansur

N. Manu Chakravarthy, The Hindu,  September 22, 2011 It [2011] is the centenary year of the legendary Jaipur-Atrauli musician Mallikarjun Mansur. Unravelling the individual genius of the maestro is also the study of a living tradition  It is not easy to locate the greatness of Pandit Mallikarjuna Mansur and understand his relevance in our times. The …

Vidya Shankar – “If you have doubts, ask Vidya!”

Vainika, vocalist, musicologist annd teacher Vidya Shankar (1919-2010) was taught by Sabhesa Iyer, Sabhapathi Iyer, Syama Sastry (descendant of the composer), and T.L. Venkatarama Iyer. Vidya Shankar founded Parampara (Association for the Preservation of Classical Carnatic Music) and authored many articles and several books: Syama Sastry’s Compositions with text, translation, svara and gamaka notation1 Saint Tyagaraja’s …